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20120928
20121006
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KRCB (PBS) 15
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> farmers fear that as a byproduct of the mining, toxic chemicals will be released into the environment and wind up in the food chain. >> conducting chemical analysis will not help me if there is poisonous stuff flying around in the air. or finding its way into the groundwater. >> there is a tradition of mining in the area. 2000 years ago, the romans mind for goals here. it is thought to have one of the biggest gold deposits in western europe. mining here is lucrative, even if the excavation is costly environmental regulations strict. the people are divided on the issue. some residents are banding together to raise support for the mine. the mother of this young family is one of them. like 40% of the population, she is out of work. >> i hope that thanks to the mine, we will be able to stay and our family will have a future here. otherwise, we will have to move away. >> but where to? the effects of the economic crisis are being felt across spain. in this region, there is little industry outside of traditional coal mining, and its days are numbered. the regional government could sorely use
high. what do you expect out of cvs with this environment you're talking about. >> well, we like the stock fair number of reasons. i think it's the right stock for the environment. we're in an environment where i don't think we're going to see tremendous growth because of the economy so companies that can grow their earnings at double-digit levels will be in favor. cvs is one of those companies. they're also giving you revenue growth. you get a little bit of a dividend, raising your dividend. earlier at 30%, and the stock is still a reasonable value trading at 13 times 2013 estimates. it's a stock that's also a play on obamacare and health care going forward. >> tom: give us 30 seconds on f.i.t.b., another one you're putting money to work for and it has really nicely. >> it has. we're seeing better scores in our models. you get a yield of about 2.5%. the stock is cheap at 10 times earnings. they're buying back over 10% of their shares. there's been insider being in the stock in recent months. i think there's a lot to like. i think the earnings story is improving. and, again, i th
chemicals in the environment that might play a role in parkinson's disease. >> narrator: the findings galvanized the scientific community. researchers began looking into whether parkinson's was caused by a variety of environmental triggers, and history seemed to support that approach. scientists knew that parkinson's hadn't even appeared in the medical literature until 1817, the beginning of the industrial revolution, when toxins were first poured into the environment. they now wondered if parkinson's could be, at least in part, a modern disease, triggered by toxins like mptp. >> i think it's a very exciting time for research in this disease. and for patients with parkinson's disease, and their families, that's good news. thank you very much. we had real hope that this would solve the disease. and i thought, three to four years we would have the answer. in fact, in three to four years, we did have an answer, and that was that mptp itself was not the cause of parkinson's. >> narrator: not the cause, but a key clue. indeed, recent studies have built on langston's initial breakthrough, s
but at least enhancing the environment that can create jobs. >> brown: do you think there's much enthusiasm? >> as a conservative i am much more enthusiastic about mitt romney than i was john mccain. i thought john mccain was just an extension of george bush. we had had enough of that. >> brown: but polls show enthusiasm remains a question mark here for mitt romney and for the president. he also has to worry about criticism from his left. people like duke economics professor william garretty who cites the almost one in five blacks out of work here and says the president simply hasn't done enough to help. >> that's pretty staggering actually. i mean, we're approaching the kinds of unemployment rates that existed in the united states at the height of the great depression. in the african-american community in north carolina. brown: he has decided to sit out the presidential vote >> i'm going to vote for the other offices on the ballot but i'm just not going to cast a vote for the presidency >> brown: you're not? no brown: you feel okay i feel okay about it. my wife tells me i'm crazy. >> ready
in on january 1. >> tom: meantime, the environment out there, we sought latest g.d.p. revisi yesterday, a slower economy faster than expected. corporate earnings also slowing down. that's happening regardless of what's going on in the political environment. >> it certainly is. earlier this summer, what was really driving stock prices, in my person was two words-- anticipated stimulus. notice, it's removal of uncertainty, and so i think the real question is will we be seeing a trough in corporate earnings in the third quarter, a trough in u.s. g.d.p., in this or the fourth quarter of the year? or might w be seegroughing a little bit later on for other international g.d.p.s. in general, i think a lot of people are anticipating that maybe the worst will soon be behind us, especially because of all this liquidity that's been pumped into the system over the past several months. >> tom: you've crunched numbers and brought some sectors to watch for next three months, including the technology area here with xlk, being the e.t.f. for the technology sector. has had a nice rally over the last 12 months. wh
that in a crisis environment at the 11th hour, some sort of arrangement will be made that will delay the fiscal contraction that's on the books now. so that the economy will continue to grow in the first half of next year, but at a slow pace. >> susie: thanks, joel. joel prakken, chairman of macro economic advisors. >> tom: still ahead, what's worse than training somebody and having them leave? not training somebody and having them stay. an on the job training program designed to create new jobs. in just a few hours, president obama and governor mitt romney will face off in the first presidential debate. as both candidates fight for votes, each has clear objectives: governor romney needs to rebuild momentum for his campaign, and the president is looking to widen his lead in the polls. to do it, they're each using their own sets of numbers. darren gersh breaks them down, and tells you what you need to know about them. >> reporter: for challenger mitt romney, tonight's debate is his best chancto sell hielf to voters who are still undecided. and one way to do that is to focus less on facts and agg
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market, the environment, a bunch of things very uneven, and gas price that is have been higher, and take the scarce income away from consumers, and the nagging concerns about other things, about the elections, and what happens with tax policy and europe. and jobs and a little bit about gas. >> tell us a little bit about the elections. >> d do you think that people will feel better just knowing who's going to be in the white house, and then go ahead with financial decisions they were going to be making and buy whatever purchases they were thinking about. >> we hope it's going to work out like that. >> when they win, we don't know the congress they're going to work with. we don't know if it's something they can put their heads together and work with or the parties will be at logger heads. >> it will be organic. we have to see who is elected and the demeanor between the president and the congress he has to work with. >> susie: and you know we hear so much from the federal reserve about how much super low interest rats are going to help the economy. to what extent are the low rates motivatin
are headed next? if the u.s. economic environment remains relatively slow, traders predict new highs for the precious metal could come in the first half of next year. that's if gold is able to break through certain technical levels. >> i think if we can get above $1,816. we should see 19 and a quarter. if we can get above $1,925, then $2,000 is definitely in our sights. >> reporter: experts say one thing that could push gold prices above $2,000 an ounce this year is if president obama is re-elected. the thinking-- the president will keep bernanke employed, which means interest rates stay very, very low. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: stocks moved higher ahead of tomorrow's report on the september job market. the s&p 500 really gained moment just after 10:00 a.m. eastern time after the commerce department released its report on september factory orders. while total orders were down, it wasn't as bad as feared. the index finished higher by seven tenths of a percent. trading volume held steady on the big board-- 672 million shares. it was just under 1.6 billion on the nasdaq. fin
to the environment to taxation. in alec task forces, elected state officials and corporate representatives close the doors to press and public and together approve the bills that will be sent out to america, but americans have no idea they come from alec unless someone like a mark pocan exposes it. >> when i went down to new orleans, to the alec convention last august, i remember going to a workshop and hearing a little bit about a bill they did in florida and some other states and there was a proposal to provide special needs scholarships and lo and behold, and i come back to wisconsin and what gets introduced? get ready i know you're going to have a shocked look on your face, a bill to do just that. >> 26 alec members in the wisconsin legislature sponsored that special needs bil but t real spsor was alec. pocan knew because the bill bore a striking resemblance to alec's model. have a look. but pocan isn't only concerned that alec sneaks bills into the state legislature. the intent behind the bills troubles him too. >> some of their legislation sounds so innocuous, but when you start to read ab
. because he looks exhausted. that's not what a president running for election in a tough environment need to be. >> we've all been pretty critical of the president including me. so i'll now bat in the one caveat. mitt romney has problems with certain voters, and those problems are tied to policies that he has advocated for over the course of this campaign. if you go out the way obama campaign looks at the map in the world and you go to individual voter groups, demographics in specific swing states, many of those problems he has with hispanic voters, didn't do anything to solve his problems with hispanic voters. he didn't solve that problem. his problem with educated women voters. those issues didn't come up in this debate, he didn't solve any problems with those people. you think about just in terms of the battle ground states, there's going to be a tightening, we're seeing a tightening already. but the obama people, we have a swing state possible this morning from nbc and "wall street journal" president obama ahead by 8 points in ohio. it remains the case tomorrow as it was earlier today
and once that began, i don't know whether he could change that environment what i was frustrated is failure to use the synapse to pop out and sitting here talking you and ji jim lehr about the pbs funding which is okay and cute and fun to talk about, how about the auto industry, i rescued it and you would let it go bankrupt. >> i am if for equal pay of women, he didn't bring up things and let romney get by with some really distracting and really unclear, in fact, untrue statements about healthcare where he said i am for coverage for preexisting conditions, his people later on said he wasn't and he said, in fact, before that he never was really for covering preexisting conditions unless, you know, it is paid for, ahead of time during, you know, continuing coverage, and a couple of times in the last week he said things like well if you get sick we won't let you die in your apartment and get you to er and yet came on last night talking about a national health plan he had which he really doesn't have. i thought he got away with a lot of things showing sympathy for social security recipients whe
general at this table, welcome. tell me how you have defined the role for nato in the current environment, especially in the middle east. >> the core role is still to protect our citizens against any threat to their security we won the cold war. we protected our citizens against soviet communism, aggression. we won the cold war. the soviet broke down but after the end of the cold war we realized that we are faced we merging security challenges, terrorism, this is the reason why we are in afghanistan. that's why we are now building a nato missile defense system to protect our populations against milz attacks. piracy, this is the reasons why we conduct counterpiracy operation. so across the board we have taken on responsibility for new missions but, again, with the core task to protect our citizens against any thrat. >> rose: how much of that is borne by the united states, both in terms of budget and in terms of resources? >> a lot, of course. the united states is the biggest ally accounting for around 80% of the overall defense expenditure in our alliance. so it really is a huge contributi
plan will kill 700,000 jobs. i don't want to kill jobs in this environment. let me make one more point. >> leer: at's not an answer-- mr. president? >> we've had this discussion before. >> lehrer: about the idea that in order to reduce the deficit, there has to be revenue in addition to cuts. >> there has to be revenue in addition to cuts. now, governor romney has ruled out revenue. he's ruled out revenue. >> absolutely. >> lehrer: completely. >> look the revenue i get is by more people working, getting higher pay, paying more taxes. that's how we get growth and how we balance the budget. but the idea of taxing people more, putting more people out of work, you'll never get there. you never balance the budget by raising taxes. spain, spain spends 42% of their total economy on government. >> lehrer: okay. >> we're now spending 42% of our economy on government. i don't want to go down the path to spain. i want to go down the path of growth that puts americans to work with more money coming in because they're working. >> lehrer: but, but, mr. president, you're saying in order to get the jo
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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